Category Archives: Engagement

Are You Earning Employee Commitment?

Client“Individual commitment to a group effort – that is what makes a team work, a company work, a society work, a civilization work.” —Vince Lombardi

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

Vince Lombardi nailed it. But, your employees don’t owe you their commitment. As a leader, it is your responsibility to earn the commitment of those in your organization. Looking out for your employees and earning their commitment is not only good for them, it’s good for you, and it’s good for business. When employees are committed to you, as a leader, and the organization, they work willingly in the best interest of the whole. It eliminates the ‘I’m only in it for me’ attitude. Employees are willing to give their ‘all’ to a leader, a cause, and a vision that they believe in. So, how can you earn employee commitment?

Relationships

The relationships you build with your employees are going to be key in earning their commitment. These relationships cannot be merely superficial; you must develop them on an individual level. This means not only being interested in them professionally, but also personally. Your relationships have to be real, no faking. Employees will see straight through your façade. Be yourself with employees; let them get to know the real, imperfect you. Show them that you are interested in their well-being and personal growth. Meaningful relationships earn commitment, boost productivity, and inspire employees to give 110%.

Trust

There will be no commitment from your employees without trust. The loyalty you need from your employees requires trust that goes both ways. No games; no tricks. Your actions and words must be honest and consistent. Show your employees that you have their backs. Create and share key learning moments with them. Be open about your failures and weaknesses. Also, you must provide them with a safe place to fail and learn from their mistakes. Give them control over their own work tasks, showing that you trust and have confidence in their abilities.

Communication

Earning commitment from your employees takes a whole lot of open and ongoing communication. Communication is a tool for sharing the organization’s stories in a way that brings employees together to be part of something important. Communication allows you to convey how employees’ work contributes to the overall success of the organization. Communication is also a two-way street. Listen more than you speak. Pay close attention to what is being shared and make sure you are on the same page. Communication helps you to remove the barriers to trust, which helps build the relationships that earn employee commitment.

Engagement

People simply work harder and are more committed when they are allowed to use their talents. When your employees are engaged in their work, they are more likely to be motivated, to remain committed to your organization, and to stay focused on achieving shared goals. Engaged employees have a sense of purpose and know they are making a difference. When you engage your employees in their work, you challenge them, bring out the best in them, and offer them the opportunity to grow and develop.

Acknowledgement

And finally, if you want to earn the commitment of your employees, acknowledge their contributions and value. Your employees are your greatest resource, don’t take them for granted. Show them that they are part of something bigger than themselves, something meaningful and important.

Earn Their Commitment

To be successful you need every employee to be committed to the group effort. They do not owe you this commitment; it is yours only when you have earned it. So, build strong relationships, develop mutual trust, cultivate open and honest communication, create an engaging workplace, and acknowledge the value and contributions of every employee. That’s how you make it work.

 

 

© 2015 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Liz Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Liz holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Liz by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

 

Three Ways to Invest in Your Employees that Won’t Cost You a Dime

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“Transformation in the world happens when people are healed and start investing in other people.” —Michael W. Smith

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

Why Invest in Your Employees?

Your time is the most valuable gift you can offer, when you make time to invest in your employees, the work environment in your organization will become a much happier place. Happy employees are more productive and quality conscious which results in higher profits. They have better interactions with both colleagues and customers which results in better experiences on every level and they make better brand ambassadors for your organization. When you invest in providing experiences that instill a sense of pride and accomplishment in each employee, your employees will give 100% to the organization. So, how can you invest in your employees without spending a dime?

Engagement

Chuck Daly said, “There’s nothing like being involved with a team that can go that distance.” One of the best investments you can make in your employees is to engage them in their work tasks, their teams, and the organization as a whole. This engagement gives them a sense of pride and satisfaction in their work. Bring out the best in them by encouraging them to take control over their own work and to identify and find solutions to problems. Listen to what they value and want to accomplish. Don’t micromanage; give your employees the skills and resources they need and then empower them to design how their work gets done. The experience your customers have with your organization is directly linked to how engaged and satisfied your employees are; invest in the engagement of your people.

Opportunity

Bobby Unser believes, “Success is where preparation and opportunity meet.” Providing opportunities to grow, personally and professionally, in the organization is a valuable investment in your employees. When employees grow, your organization grows; when they excel, you excel. Your employees are your most valuable asset, don’t let them feel underutilized. Continually give them the opportunity to gain experience and control their own work tasks. Offer them mentorship opportunities and give them access to training and development resources. Prepare your people to move on to something bigger and better; invest in offering your employees opportunity.

Culture

Ken Robinson tells us, “The role of a creative leader is not to have all the ideas; it’s to create a culture where everyone can have ideas and feel that they’re valued.” Investment in your organizational culture is one of the most important investments you can make. When you develop a culture that inspires a sense of community and truly engages employees, you create a trusting and safe environment for collaboration. This type of culture is all-inclusive, embracing differences and a encouraging the sharing of ideas. It emphasizes the development of relationships and open communication throughout the organization regardless of title or position. A strong culture recognizes the value that every employee contributes to the success of the organization; invest in your culture.

Make the Investment

Bob Parsons advises, “Never stop investing. Never stop improving. Never stop doing something new.” When we think of making an investment, we see dollar signs. But, as leaders, there are many investments in our employees that we can make that won’t cost us a dime. And, the return we will see is immeasurable. Offer your employees engaging work, provide them with opportunities to grow, and create a culture that embraces a sense of community and the development of relationships. Make the investment in your employees and watch the return.

 

 

© 2015 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

Five Toxic Leadership Behaviors that Poison Culture

 

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“Live or die, but don’t poison everything.” —Anne Sexton

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

Leadership Behaviors

What you, as a leader, do everyday has a ripple effect throughout your organization. This ripple impacts the culture of the organization and determines how things are done and the level of performance you get from your employees. Are you, as a leader, nurturing or poisoning your culture? Do your behaviors give the impression that you are micromanaging everything? Are you communicating effectively? Are you so focused on what needs to be done that you forget why you are even doing it? Have you developed relationships built on mutual trust or are you fostering distrust? Are you tearing down silos in your organization or are you reinforcing them? Learn to recognize and avoid these five toxic leadership behaviors that poison culture.

Micromanagement

Kris Carr tells us, “Sometimes our need to control and micromanage everything erodes our confidence in ourselves and others. The truth: people are much more capable than we think.” Micromanagement is the result of a lack of trust and a need to feel in control. When you micromanage, you undermine you employees’ confidence in their own abilities and stifle any growth or progress they have the potential to make. Employees who are being micromanaged become frustrated and begin wasting time and resources rather than delivering exceptional performance. This type of work environment destroys morale and engagement and poisons culture. Help your employees develop their skills and gain the experience necessary to become the best they can be. Learn to trust their abilities and allow them to do their jobs. When employees feel respected and appreciated they will become more productive, more loyal, and more engaged.

Poor communication

Yehuda Berg said, “Words are singularly the most powerful force available to humanity. We can choose to use this force constructively with words of encouragement, or destructively using words of despair.” Communication is at the heart of how you, as a leader, achieve your goals. The way you communicate can create strong connections and inspire trust or it can destroy trust, morale, and engagement. Are you using your communication to build others up or to tear them down? Be transparent in your communication. You can’t know everything; ask questions, get clarification, and listen openly to the answers and suggestion your employees have to offer. Be collaborative, consider the perspective of others, and frame your communication to fit your audience. When your employees know there is open, two-way communication throughout the organization, they will be better informed and more inclined to share their knowledge and ideas.

Focusing on what instead of why

John F. Kennedy believed, “Efforts and courage are not enough without purpose and direction.” Are you focusing so much on what you do that you have forgotten why you are doing it? You can have a vision of the future that tells you where you are going but you and your employees need a purpose that tells you why you are going there. There is more to your purpose than the bottom line; it’s not just about money, it has to be about making a difference. As a leader, you must make your purpose come alive for those who follow you; focus on the impact you want to have on the world. Your employees want to know that their work has meaning, that they are part of something bigger than themselves, something that matters. If you want a resilient organization that can stand the test of time you need a strong culture; this culture must be based on why, not what. Does everyone know why the organization exists? Where it is going? How it is going to get there? What role they play?  Focus your energy on the why and allow your employees to help you figure out and implement the what that will get you there.

Lack of trust

Eric Hoffer explained, “Someone who thinks the world is always cheating him is right. He is missing that wonderful feeling of trust in someone or something.” The most important attribute you can develop as a leader is the ability to inspire trust. Without developing mutual trust you cannot lead effectively; your culture will suffer and your employees will never reach their full potential. You must create a safe space for discussion, debate, and collaborative problem-solving. Learn to welcome the challenges, criticism, and conflicting opinions that employees have to offer. Let them know that you always have their back. Show that you are authentic in all your dealings. The level of trust you develop in your organization will either add to your ability to influence others of subtract from your authority and poison your culture.

Us vs. them mentality

Sharon Salzberg said, “We can learn the art of fierce compassion – redefining strength, deconstructing isolation and renewing a sense of community, practicing letting go of rigid us-vs.-them thinking.” An us vs. them mentality divides your team, undermines your strength, and destroys your culture. You are a team; don’t let your position of authority lead you to believe you are better than anyone else. This mentality builds the silos that lead to ineffective collaboration, distrust, and a breakdown in communication. Be humble and recognize that none of you could do it on your own. Get rid of the us vs. them mentality and build trusting relationships and a sense of community throughout your organization.

Nurture Culture

What type of culture is your behavior as a leader developing? Have you developed your employees enough that you trust them to do their jobs without being micromanaged? Are your employees comfortable and even encouraged to challenge or question you? Does everyone in your organization know why they are doing what they do? Have you developed mutual trust throughout your organization? Do your employees work and collaborate as a cohesive team or have you allowed silos to be built? Pay attention to your behavior on a daily basis, I can guarantee that your employees are watching. Make sure you leadership behaviors are nurturing rather than poisoning your culture.

 

 

© 2015 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

Taking Action

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“Action is the foundational key to all success.” —Pablo Picasso

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

Why Take Action?

Success is about action! It’s not what you know, who you know, or how lucky you are. It’s about what you do with what you have, where you are, right now. Taking action is a conscious choice. No one has ever achieved success by accident; every successful person made the decision to take action. Don’t know where to start; start by developing a clear vision for your future, decide what you must do to get there, and then take action. Not only is it important for you to motivate and discipline yourself to take action, but also to inspire others to act. Taking action become easier once you have a clear vision, authentic engagement, and confidence.

Vision

The Dalai Lama said, “In order to carry a positive action, we must develop here a positive vision.” What is your vision? What action can you take, that if done repeatedly, will result in you realizing that vision? Can you inspire others to take action with you? Learn to see the opportunities, in every situation. How can you use them to achieve your vision? Get others on the bandwagon; encourage them to contribute their great ideas and strategic thinking to your vision and plan for achieving it. Get specific with your vision; see it, and then go for it.

Engagement

It is easier to take action if you are engaged. Jack Welch stated, “An organization’s ability to learn, and translate that learning into action rapidly, is the ultimate competitive advantage.” Jack Welch’s comment applies on an individual as well as an organizational level. Engage yourself and others in envisioning new ideas, innovating, developing a strategy, and collaborating. Inspire the passion in yourself and others that lights the fire of action. Create an authentic connection to you goals and then become fully engaged in taking action.

Confidence

Dale Carnegie believed, “Inaction breeds doubt and fear. Action breeds confidence and courage. If you want to conquer fear, do not sit home and think about it. Go get busy.” In order to take action, you must overcome your fear, complacency, and disengagement. This does not mean that you will not feel these things, only that you will not let them dictate your choice to take action. Taking action becomes easier once you develop the confidence you need to take risks and confront challenges head-on. Build your confidence; take action.

Taking Action

Joel Barker told us, “Vision without action is merely a dream. Action without vision just passes the time. Vision with action can change the world.” What is your vision? Can you see it? Now, how are you going to achieve it? Only through action can your dreams become real. Move yourself and others to take action. Start by creating a compelling, clear vision. Then light the fire of passion and engagement. Finally, grow your confidence. The one thing that separates those who achieve their vision from those who do not is action. Take action today!

 

 

 

 

 

 

© 2015 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

What Do Employees Really Want?

 

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“Employees who believe that management is concerned about them as a whole person – not just an employee – are more productive, more satisfied, more fulfilled. Satisfied employees mean satisfied customers, which leads to profitability.” —Anne M. Mulcahy

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

Why You Should Care

Why should you care about what your employees really want? As Anne M. Mulcahy stated, employees are more productive, satisfied, and fulfilled   when they know you care. Studies show that 70% of employees do not feel engaged in their work. Research has shown that employees are more likely to leave their positions because of their boss than any other reason. Yet, employers tend to think that a much higher percentage of employees leave for more money than any other factor. Less than 25% of leaders have a strategy for engagement. Only 40% of employees feel they even know the goals and strategy of their organization. Engaged employees are 87% less likely to leave their positions. Organizations with happy, engaged employees have two-and-a-half times the revenue and two times the net income of organizations with unhappy, disengaged employees.

The happiness and engagement of your employees affect your success and your bottom line. This should be reason enough for you to care. So, what do employees really want? I.C.E. is a good place to start.

Inclusion

Brian Eno suggested, “You either believe that people respond to authority, or that they respond to kindness and inclusion. I’m obviously in the latter camp. I think people respond better to reward than punishment.” Your employees want to be involved in something bigger than themselves. They want to know their company mission; they want to be able to tell the world what their company is up to; to be proud of where they work. Include employees in progress and strategy meetings. Encourage them to share the great things that are happening in the organization. Let them tell the story and be ambassadors for your brand.

Concern

Chris Hemsworth explained, “People who put themselves on the line and sacrifice their own safety for the greater good and for others, and anyone in any profession whose concern is the welfare for other people instead of the individual are inspiring and important.” It doesn’t matter your position or industry, you can always put your people before yourself. Let them know that you care. Your employees want a leader who provides them with concern for the greater good, empowerment, honesty, accountability, respect, and authenticity. Show them that you have concern for their growth and capability; recognize what they’re capable of and empower them to reach their full potential. Care for them as a person, not just an employee.

Engagement

Gary Hamel believed, “The real damper on employee engagement is the soggy, cold blanket of centralized authority. In most companies, power cascades downwards from the CEO. Not only are employees disenfranchised from most policy decisions, they lack even the power to rebel against egocentric and tyrannical supervisors.” Employees want opportunities, responsibilities, and tasks that are directly related to achieving the goals and mission of the organization they work for. When employees are engaged they are more satisfied and create more value for the company. They want to be challenged and empowered to design their own tasks. When you engage your employees they will be more committed to accomplishing something valuable not only for the company, but for themselves, and their community.

Make it Happen

Ian Smith said, “I think happiness is a combination of pleasure, engagement, and meaningfulness.” Include your employees by sharing where the organization is, where it is going, and allow them to help design how to get there. Demonstrate genuine interest and concern for your employees as individuals. Show them that you care about them on a personal level, not just as an employee. Make sure they can see that you are looking out for their best interests before your own. Engage them in meaningful work that they find interesting and rewarding. Giving employees what they really want using I.C.E. is a simple step that will provide lasting reward.

 

 

 

 

© 2015 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

Developing a Healthy Culture in 2015

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“Businesses often forget about the culture, and ultimately, they suffer for it because you can’t deliver good service from unhappy employees.” —Tony Hsieh
By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

Why Culture?

As we approach the start of a new year, it’s the perfect opportunity to set a goal for developing a healthy culture in your organization in 2015. Now, of course, merely setting a goal is not nearly enough, but laying out a plan is a great starting point. While many leaders view culture as the latest buzzword in organizational leadership, the truth is, your culture may have a bigger impact on the performance of your organization than any other single factor. Culture drives success; your culture impacts your level of engagement, growth, and innovation. Your culture determines the on-the-ground actions, behaviors, and decisions of your employees. A healthy culture does not happen by accident, it is intentionally developed. So, what can you do to start developing a healthy culture in 2015?

Set the example

Rupert Murdoch told us, “In motivating people, you’ve got to engage their minds and their hearts. I motivate people, I hope, by example – and perhaps by excitement, by having productive ideas to make others feel involved.” As the leader, you are the one responsible for creating the culture in your organization. Focus on the positive behaviors you want to see in your organization and then set the example for others to follow. Show people that you value the employees at every level of the organization. Help them see that their actions and decisions have value. Communicate respectfully and authentically. Then, celebrate small achievements.

 Help them grow

Benjamin Franklin believed, “Without continual growth and progress, such words as improvement, achievement, and success have no meaning.” If you want to have a healthy culture you must invest in the development of your employees. This shows them that they are valued. Help them to build positive self-identities. Offer them the opportunity to design their own work. Make learning something to be celebrated. Show them the trust it takes to allow them to learn from mistakes without fear. Encourage them to participate in the decision-making in your organization.

Share your values

Your culture is based on group norms of behavior; shared values are what keep those norms in place. Roy E. Disney said, “When your values are clear to you, making decisions becomes easier.” Share your values with your employees. Help them see how these values play into the long-term focus of the organization. Then, help them understand the importance of the role they play in that focus. Once you share your values you can start to develop shared, healthy organizational habits.

Healthy Culture/Happy Employees

James Sinegal explained, “When employees are happy, they are your very best ambassadors.” Develop a healthy culture that will keep your employees happy. Set the example, help them grow, and share your values. Connect meaning and value to them as individuals and to the tasks they perform for your organization. Remember, your culture will influence the actions, behaviors, and decisions of every employee. Make intentionally developing a healthy culture in 2015 a priority and see what success you can achieve.

 

 

 

© 2014 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

Do You Really Want to Communicate?

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“To effectively communicate, we must realize that we are all different in the way we perceive the world and use this understanding as a guide to our communication with others.” —Tony Robbins

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

Communication

Just because you are talking doesn’t mean you are communicating. Are your conversations one-sided? Are you listening with judgment? Are you so busy formulating a response that you miss the message? The point of communication is to try to create a shared perception of the world. Develop the habit of really engaging in conversation. Learn to show respect when communicating. And, recognize that, while there may be differing points of view, you can still communicate effectively.

Engage

Nelson Mandela said, “A good leader can engage in a debate frankly and thoroughly, knowing that at the end he and the other side must be closer, and thus emerge stronger.” You and the other side will never get closer to the same understanding if you do not engage in good, two-way communication. It’s difficult to have a productive conversation that is confrontational, demeaning, or judgmental. To have constructive conversations, try asking questions that will draw on a positive memory or feeling; this deepens the sense of well-being and trust. When we feel at ease we are more likely to be open to having productive conversations. Interact directly whenever possible. Make others feel like they are part of the conversation and that their input is valued. In a successful conversation both parties walk away feeling that they have been heard and have a better understanding of where the other is coming from.

Respect

Bryant H. McGill believed, “One of the most sincere forms of respect is actually listening to what another has to say.” Ask others for their perspectives or personal opinions; this shows you have respect for them and their input. Share the floor. Don’t act as if it’s your way or nothing. Be confident but not arrogant when you’re communicating. Learn to paint the big picture for others and help them to see how they fit in. Have enough respect to give credit where it is due. Only speak for yourself and remain genuine and receptive. Make it clear how much you care about the success of others and that you respect and value their opinions.

Two views

Harper Lee explained, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view.” If you want to really communicate you must acknowledge that there are differences in how any two people view reality and situations. Learn to focus on what others are saying at the moment without interrupting or passing judgment. Then, confirm your understanding and ask follow-up questions. Don’t dance around uncomfortable questions, answer first and then elaborate if necessary. This open give and take is what allows you to create a shared understanding of the situation.

Make the Effort

Truman Capote stated, “A conversation is a dialogue, not a monologue. That’s why there are so few good conversations: due to scarcity, two intelligent talkers seldom meet.” In order to have good conversations you must learn to engage not lecture. You must show respect. And, you must recognize that there are two differing points of view involved in every conversation. We all find it difficult to communicate sometimes but, good conversations can happen if you are willing to make the effort.

 

 

 

© 2014 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

Making a Leadership Difference

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“Make a difference about something other than yourselves.” —Toni Morrison

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

Time to Evaluate

As we approach the end of the year, what a great time to evaluate the difference that our leadership is making. The difference I am talking about is not on the bottom line, it’s in the lives of your employees. Do they look to you for direction? Do they know you have their back? Do they feel that you value them as individuals? Does your leadership last in your absence? Maybe it’s time to hone some of your leadership behaviors.

Communication

Communication is one of the most powerful forces in leadership. Yehuda Berg explained, “Words are singularly the most powerful force available to humanity. We can choose to use this force constructively with words of encouragement, or destructively using words of despair. Words have energy and power with the ability to help, to heal, to hinder, to hurt, to harm, to humiliate, and to humble.” How would your employees rate your communication? Your ability to communicate openly and effectively determines how well you connect with others. This ability consists not only of how well you speak, but how well you listen. Are your communications inclusive? Do you approach your conversations with curiosity and engagement? Show employees that you value their input by asking and expressing appreciation for their opinions. Listen with the intent to understand; acknowledge your own biases and keep them in check. When you, as a leader, communicate well, your organization will be more efficient, your employees will give their best efforts, and you will have a stronger culture with higher morale.

Respect

Estelle Parsons said, “It is so important to get respect for what you do and at the same time give it.” Is there mutual respect in your organization? Estelle’s quote applies to your employees as well as yourself. As a leader, it is so important that you acknowledge, respect, and appreciate the contributions that each of your employees make to the success of the whole. Show that you are interested and see value in each of them as individuals. Tune into their needs and invest your time and energy to their development. Show that you respect their ideas by inviting them to challenge your thinking. Respect your employees enough to be authentic and open with them. Be willing to share your wisdom, but also to learn from their experiences and knowledge.

Courage

How courageous are you as a leader? Robert Green Ingersoll believed, “The greatest test of courage on earth is to bear defeat without losing heart.” Do you have the courage to stand behind the right decisions made by either you or your employees? Your employees need to know that you have their back. As a leader, you must also have the courage to seek new opportunities and challenge the status quo. You must admit your faults but not let your failures discourage you. Show enough confidence to make the tough decisions while sticking to your core values. Have the courage to let your employees see that you are open to constructive criticism and new challenges.

Collaboration

Mattie Stepanek explained, “Unity is strength… when there is teamwork and collaboration wonderful things can be achieved.” As a leader, don’t just dictate what is to be done, use collaboration to help your team come up with the best solutions. Do you anticipate the needs of your employees and are you proactive in meeting them? When you give your employees the tools they need and put the right people in the right roles, as Mattie said, wonderful things can be achieved. Engage and encourage employees to actively participate in organizational improvements and decision-making. Set an example by placing the good of the whole above your own. Be transparent and keep team members well-informed. Foster debate and value differing opinions throughout your organization. And, make sure you develop a vision that your employees can buy into and work toward together.

Making a Difference

If you want to make an impact as a leader, make a difference in the lives of your employees. Use communication as a means for sharing your wisdom with others while showing curiosity and appreciation for their opinions, skills, and knowledge. Develop mutual respect. Have the courage to stand behind your employees 100%. Encourage collaboration to achieve wonderful things. Engage in these leadership behaviors and you will be making a leadership difference.

 

 

© 2014 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

What Might You Gain by Embracing Challenge?

 

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“Challenge is the pathway to engagement and progress in our lives. But not all challenges are created equal. Some challenges make us feel alive, engaged, connected, and fulfilled. Others simply overwhelm us. Knowing the difference as you set bigger and bolder challenges for yourself is critical to your sanity, success, and satisfaction.” —Brendon Burchard

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

Challenge

Life is about learning and growing. You continually need new challenges to encourage you to work even harder to achieve your goals. By accepting and overcoming challenges you become a stronger, more adaptable person. How can embracing challenge benefit you?

Engagement

Martin Luther King, Jr. said, “Rarely do we find men who willingly engage in hard, solid thinking. There is an almost universal quest for easy answers and half-baked solutions. Nothing pains some people more than having to think.” Don’t shy away from engaging in difficult thinking. And, don’t let fear stop you from taking action. Start by doing what you can with what you have, soon you will be able to do more than you ever thought possible. Follow passion and get engaged in following your dreams, challenges and all.

Evolution

Oprah Winfrey said, “The whole point of being alive is to evolve into the complete person you were intended to be.” Change is the new normal and challenges offer you the opportunity to evolve. When you become complacent and satisfied with the status quo you are placing limits on the level of success you can achieve. Challenges offer great learning opportunities; stretching you beyond your comfort zone. Invest in yourself by engaging in a variety of activities and taking advantage of learning opportunities. You will evolve as you gain the new skills and knowledge necessary to conquer the challenges you encounter.

Opportunities

We’ve all heard Thomas Edison’s observation, “Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.” Think of the opportunities accepting and conquering challenges may offer. What new experiences might you have? Who might you meet? What might you learn? Accept the challenge, do the work, and make great things happen. Embrace enthusiasm for accomplishment and use it as motivation to tackle new and even more difficult challenges.

Are You Ready?

Sean Connery tells us, “There’s always a new challenge to keep you motivated.” Are you ready to feel engaged, to evolve both personally and professionally, and open yourself up to new opportunities? Challenges can serve to catapult you along the path to achieving your goals. So, roll up your sleeves and get to work; you are ready.

 

 

 

© 2014 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

 

Growing New Leaders

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“Growing other leaders from the ranks isn’t just the duty of the leader, it’s an obligation.” —Warren Bennis

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

Why Grow New Leaders?

Developing leaders throughout your organization places you in a position to conquer new leadership challenges where innovation and flexibility are the keys to success. When you build on the expertise within the ranks of your organization you improve efficiency and effectiveness. Growing new leaders allows you to tap into the talent and potential of your team members. Let’s look at three of the factors that promote the growing and nurturing of new leaders.

Environment

You must start by creating an environment where others have the opportunity and are encouraged to lead. Develop a culture where employees embrace collaboration and open communication. Value the diversity that offers a continual flow of new perspectives. Provide employees with an environment that challenges them in a way that engages and inspires. Encourage the sharing of ideas by asking great questions and valuing the answers you receive. Provide work that employees can feel passionate about. Network and relationship building are important factors in leadership. Help and encourage employees to build their network and develop strong relationships built on trust and respect. Implement programs where new leaders can be mentored.

Opportunity

If you want to grow new leaders you must provide them with experiences that help them understand who they are, what they stand for, and what their strengths and weaknesses are. Give them the opportunity to participate in solving difficult problems. Allow them to make mistakes and help them learn how to grow from the lesson these mistakes teach. Encourage them to share their ideas and allow them to participate in planning and implementation of new ideas. Every employee has valuable ideas, insights, and perspectives; engage them in productive conversations. When employees feel like they are an integral part of the organization they will be more motivated and engaged in growing as a leader.

Aptitude

Give employees the training and experiences they need to develop leadership skills. These skills will enable them to have a positive influence on colleagues, make informed decisions, and contribute new ideas. Help them develop an understanding of their own biases and how these biases can impact decision making. Teach them to appreciate the benefits of obtaining diverse points of view. Help them develop the ability to ask the right questions so they can make sense of overwhelming amounts of information. Teach them the value of networking. Create in them an ownership mentality. And, most importantly, serve as a role-model of good leadership and show them how to bring out the best in others.

Everyone Wins

Everyone wins when you grow new leaders and develop the leadership pipeline throughout your organization. When you have individuals with leadership ability at every level of your organization you increase the speed at which you can respond to change, your ability to be flexible, and your ability to respond to uncertainty. When you become more involved in the leadership development of your employees you will experience improved employee and customer satisfaction. By growing new leaders, your organization becomes more nimble and innovative, able to respond more quickly to customer needs and changes in the business environment.

 

 

© 2014 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.