Category Archives: Inspiration

How are You Going to Get to the Next Level of Greatness?

up_stairs“Our minds influence the key activity of the brain, which then influences everything; perception, cognition, thoughts and feelings, personal relationships; they’re all a projection of you.” —Deepak Chopra
So here you are; you have come so far. But, is this where you are going to stop? Or, are you ready to reach the next level of greatness? As you start out on your journey, here are five questions to ask yourself.

Who are you?

Not the ‘who’ that everyone has been telling you to be, but the ‘who’ you were before you started believing them. Who were you when you were a child, young and naive? Who are you when you are alone with your thoughts, where no one can see or hear you? If you want to get to the next level of greatness, you have to find who you are at your very core.

What stories are you telling yourself?

Are they the same stories that you tell the world? Where did they come from? When did they start? Who first told them to you? And, most important, are they true? The stories that you tell yourself will either propel you to the next level of greatness or serve as an anchor around your neck that will sink you. Make sure you are telling yourself the right stories. Word of warning here, don’t lie to yourself; find positive, inspiring, powerful stories that are true.

What are your strengths?

While it’s good to minimize your weaknesses, your energy is much better spent on building on your strengths. What can you do to become even stronger? Can you become a subject matter expert, the go to person in your area of strength? If you want to reach the next level of greatness you can’t be a jack-of-all-trades; identify your strengths and run with them.

What are your goals?

You can’t reach the next level of greatness by wandering lost in the woods. Get realistic about where you are and then visualize what that next level looks like. What does it feel like? Now, set some goals to get you from here to there. Not giant, overwhelming goals; set small incremental goals that serve as stepping stones.

Who do you need to become?

The answer to this question holds the key to all success. The person that got you here can’t get you to the next level of greatness. So, what kind of individual would be able to attain that level? What would they know? How would they act? Who would they spend their time with? What habits would they have? Well, if you want to get to the next level, you’re going to have to become that person. So, get busy.

The Key

You hold the key to getting to the next level of greatness. It’s inside of you right now. You’re going to have to do some deep, sometimes uncomfortable soul searching to figure out who you really are. Then, you are going to have to unravel years’ worth of stories to get to the bottom of where they came from and if they are even true. You are going to have to start telling yourself new, powerful, and positive stories. You’re going to have to dig down and identify your true strengths and then pursue these strengths rather than fretting over your weaknesses.

You’re going to have to figure out how you are going to get from here to there and set some goals to keep yourself on track. And finally, you MUST figure out who you need to become in order to reach the next level of greatness. Now for the catch, answering all of these questions, no matter how deep you dig and how honest you are with yourself will get you nowhere without action.

So, get out there and get going!

 

 

© 2016 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Liz Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the Founder of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Liz holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Liz by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

Inspiring Change, One Person at a Time

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“Things do not change; we change.”—Henry David Thoreau

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

Inspiring Change

Henry David Thoreau’s words serve as a strong reminder that only through changing ourselves do we change our circumstances. Just as leaders are not born, but are built by day-to-day behaviors, so are the changes in your organization. When you develop and encourage your employees, they become the change that you desire for your organization.  The attention you give, the support you provide, and the example that you set shines as a beacon, inspiring change, one person at a time.

So, how can you inspire others to change?

Vision

The Dalai Lama said, “In order to carry a positive action we must develop here a positive vision.” If you want to inspire in others the desire to change as individuals, in order to spur change in your organization, you must put forth a strong, vivid vision that they can buy into. Everyone needs a clear understanding of where the organization is headed and how their activities contribute. You must create a sense of inclusion where every employee understands the role they play in working towards a worthwhile, positive vision.

Engagement

Rupert Murdoch believes, “In motivating people, you’ve got to engage their minds and their hearts.” You can’t bully or manipulate people into lasting change. They must follow you through thick and thin because they want to, because they are engaged, and they believe in you. Help your employees find their calling, engage them in using their talents for the good of the organization. Make their work meaningful. Build trust, help them develop their skills, and then give them control over their own work tasks. Help them succeed and then give credit for a job well done. When you invest in and engage employees, they become better and, as they become better, your organization becomes stronger.

Opportunity

Albert Einstein told us, “All that is valuable in human society depends upon the opportunity for development accorded the individual.” Only when you give others the opportunity to develop and grow as individuals will they become more valuable. And, only through increasing the value of individuals, can you bring about true and lasting change. Give employees the opportunity to be involved. Encourage them to dig deeper and challenge the status quo. As a leader, give of your time, sharing your knowledge and experience with employees to help them to grow and become the best they can be.

One Person at a Time

Change is built and sustained through everyday action, one person at a time. When you invest in helping your employees become the best they can be, you will build a strong capacity for lasting change. Put forth a compelling, positive vision that each employee can be part of. Engage them in their work; provide them the skills and resources necessary and then give them control. Open the doors of opportunity so employees can continue to grow. If you want change, you must inspire it, one person at a time.

 

 

© 2015 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

Why is a Compelling Vision so Important?

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“Don’t underestimate the power of your vision to change the world. Whether that world is your office, your community, an industry, or a global movement, you need to have a core belief that what you contribute can fundamentally change the paradigm or way of thinking about problems.” —Leroy Hood

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

Vision

Your vision provides you with a description of the future that fulfills a deep hope within you. It clarifies where you want to go on an individual, team, and organizational level. Defining your vision helps you determine what skills, knowledge, tools, technologies, and abilities you will need to get from here to there. Having a compelling vision is not negotiable; it impacts the motivation, energy, and inspiration of yourself, your team, and your organization. As a leader, why should you promote a compelling vision in your organization and how can you do it?

Motivation

Les Brown believes, “Wanting something is not enough. You must hunger for it. Your motivation must be absolutely compelling in order to overcome the obstacles that will invariably come your way.” When employees’ lack a clear vision of where they are going, they often feel unmotivated and uncommitted; they feel their time and talent are going to waste. This is the perfect recipe for everyone to start working on their own agenda, and that is the perfect storm for your organization to fail to achieve the vision you have set. In order to keep everyone motivated, you must create a compelling, shared vision of the future where everyone wins.

Energy

Oprah Winfrey feels that, “Passion is energy. Feel the power that comes from focusing on what excites you.” When your employees have a clear and compelling vision, it unleashes the energy within them that will move them towards that vision. Help them to see what winning will look like and then link your vision to that picture. Tap into shared attitude, core values, and beliefs for the energy to keep moving forward and doing whatever it take to achieve your vision.

Inspiration

Ella Fitzgerald said, “Just don’t give up trying to do what you really want to do. Where there is love and inspiration, I don’t think you can go wrong.” When the vision for your organization fits into the values, ideas, and activities that inspire your employees they will be more committed, more productive, and more loyal. Inspire your employees by making your vision come alive for them; show them how important the role they play is in the big picture. Help them to envision how the future looks for them and inspire them with a deep sense of purpose. Reassure them that they are part of something meaningful, something greater than themselves.

Develop a Compelling Vision

If you don’t know where you are going, how will know what you need to get there? A compelling vision is important on an individual level and becomes even more essential as it spreads to teams, communities, and organizations. It is important for you, as a leader, to develop a vision so compelling that your employees can see, and even feel the opportunity that the future holds. Use your vision to motivate, energize, and inspire employees to work with you toward building that future.

 

 

 

© 2015 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

Inspiring Others

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“The most important thing is to try and inspire people so that they can be great in whatever they want to do.” —Kobe Bryant

 By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

Inspiration

Whether you like Kobe Bryant or not, his quote shows that he’s definitely on to something. What an incredible purpose, to live your life as to inspire others to give their absolute best efforts toward achieving their goals. You have the opportunity to inspire those around you on a daily basis. If you can learn to understand their motivations, you can inspire them and ignite their passions. You must first build authentic connections on a personal level. Offer your time and energy to help others grow and flourish. Spark their curiosity and inspire a passion for participation, innovation, and problem-solving. Your ability to inspire others is dependent on how they perceive you; make sure they see you as mutually trusting, authentic, and encouraging.

Trust

Booker T. Washington explained, “Few things can help an individual more than to place responsibility on him and to let him know that you trust him.” The influence you have with others makes you a leader, and to be successful in that role, formal or informal, you must develop relationships based on trust and commitment. Trust is a two-way street. You must earn the trust of those around you, but you must also demonstrate your trust in them. Trust provides the foundation from which you build the relationships that allow you to influence and inspire others. Get to know others on a personal level and show genuine interest in them. Include them in goal setting and decision-making processes. Ask for their input and give them the autonomy that shows you trust their intentions and abilities.

People look to those they trust and admire for inspiration. Be open and transparent in all your interactions. Be authentic and show you care. As you earn trust, you will also earn the opportunity to serve as an inspiration to others.

Set an example

Rupert Murdoch said, “In motivating people, you’ve got to engage their minds and their hearts. I motivate people, I hope, by example – and perhaps by excitement, by having productive ideas to make others feel involved.” The day-to-day example that you set plays a big role in your ability to be an inspiration to those around you. Everyone is looking for someone to inspire them. Act as a mentor to those looking for guidance. Show them how to set and then work toward goals. Make sure you’re available and willing to help those in need. Be authentic and live your life so that when others see your behaviors they will be inspired to model them.

Encouragement

John C. Maxwell tells us, “If you are a leader, you should never forget that everyone needs encouragement. And everyone who receives it – young or old, successful or less than successful, unknown or famous – is changed by it.” What better to be known for than as someone whose inspiration and encouragement changed the lives of those who came in contact with them? People are most satisfied when they feel empowered with a sense of control, independence, and value. They are encouraged when their contributions and ideas are respected. If your want to inspire others, help them to see the value and meaning they have to offer. Encourage them to be active participants in their own success.

Inspiring Others

Harold S. Geneen explained, “The best way to inspire people to superior performance is to convince them by everything you do and by your everyday attitude that you are wholeheartedly supporting them.” Inspire others by showing trust, setting a good example, and being of encouragement. Develop trusting relationships where you can inspire individuals to collaborate, share knowledge, and innovate on their own or in a group. Be authentic in your words and actions so others can see exactly what is inspiring about you. Help them become the best that they can be. Ignite passion and commitment which will inspire them to put forth their best efforts. And, the bonus is, the people who are inspired by you will turn around and share that inspiration with others.

 

 

 

© 2014 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

 

You Can Do This

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“The difference between a successful person and others is not a lack of strength, not a lack of knowledge, but rather a lack of will.” —Vince Lombardi

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

It’s All About You

Maya Angelo reminded us that, “Success is liking yourself, liking what you do, and liking how you do it.” It’s all about you; you are in control. Have you thought about all the possibilities? We all have dreams. Do you have the will and dedication to make yours come true?

Dreams

What are your dreams? Dig beneath the material things and accomplishments. What are the feelings associated with achieving your dreams? Your brain does not respond to things or actions, it responds to the way those things make you feel. Develop a clear vision of where you are going. Now see yourself on that journey.

Motivation

Success takes action. What motivates you? What is your “why”? Place reminders where you will see them every day to remind you why your dreams are important. Make a plan and then develop the self-discipline necessary to stick to that plan. Don’t let yourself become complacent and content with the status quo. Make the commitment to yourself that your dreams will be a priority.

Opportunity

Bobby Unser said, “Success is where preparation and opportunity meet.” Evaluate your strengths and weaknesses. Take the steps necessary to ensure you will be prepared when an opportunity arises. Learn to recognize opportunity in unexpected forms and places. Be prepared to sell yourself and your abilities. When you position yourself to win it is only a matter of time before the right opportunity presents itself.

Fear

We’ve all heard that people fear public speaking more than they fear death. But, for all of you who have been required to give a speech publically, you didn’t die did you? Nothing horrific happened. In fact, I would bet that you actually felt a certain level of pride afterward. Proud of the fact that you succeeded in facing your fear. Bill Cosby said, “In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.” Learn to embrace the fear. The more you try, the more you fail; the more you fail, the closer you are to success.

You Can Do This

Arnold H. Glasow told us that, “Success isn’t a result of spontaneous combustion. You must set yourself on fire.” Chase your dreams, come to know you motivations, seize opportunity, overcome your fear, and then celebrate the small wins along the way. It’s all about you; you are in control; you can do this.

 

 

© 2014 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

Stifling Employee Engagement

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Stifling Employee Engagement

“When people are financially invested, they want a return. When people are emotionally invested, they want to contribute.” — Simon Sinek

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

Employee Engagement

Employees want to be challenged, to have control over their work tasks, and have the opportunity to continue increasing their knowledge and skill set. When employees feel fully engaged they become emotionally committed to working hard in the best interest of the organization.

Are You Stifling Employee Engagement?

Do the employees throughout your organization know that they share in the success of the organization? If you want your employees to do more than just show up to work, you must consciously develop a culture that engages them in their work and shows appreciation for the contributions they make to the success of the organization. Watch out for these management behaviors that stifle employee engagement.

Unsupportive culture

Corporate culture affects performance and contributes to the social control that influences the way employees behave and make decisions. Culture bonds individuals together on a social level to make them feel included in the experience of the organization. Engagement must become part of the culture. When employees enjoy their work and the environment they work in they are more loyal, innovative, provide better customer service, and strive to continually improve the organization.

Out-dated view of work

In the early 20th century, Fredrick Taylor pioneered scientific management. This form of management focused on production and breaking projects into tasks. Employees could then be trained to specialize in a specific task. Taylor emphasized efficiency, control, and predictability. This view of leadership treated employees like instruments that leaders could manipulate. The focus of leadership was on the needs of the organization and not those of employees.

Times have changed; as employees become more educated and skilled, their desire to participate in the leadership and decision-making process increases. High performing employees expect the opportunity to participate and be independent. Your employees are the core of your product or service. They should find their work to be fulfilling and meaningful. If you want your employees to be engaged in their work, you should reevaluate and make adjustments to how you view work.

Lack of investment

Employee engagement requires the investment of resources to continually develop employee knowledge and skills. Talented employees want to continuously improve themselves. As a leader, you must focus on their development and offer them meaningful opportunities to contribute to the organization.

Lack of commitment

A culturethat supports employee engagement requires full commitment from management since that’s where the responsibility for employee engagement falls.Spend time helping employees succeed. Make sure you, as a leader, and your employees are committed to the right things.

Lack of inspiration

When employees do not feel inspired by those who lead them they will not be fully engaged in the organization. Employees are motivated by shared trust, values, and purpose. By developing and maintaining trusting relationships you can inspire individuals to collaborate, share knowledge, and contribute to the development of new organizational knowledge. Let employees know, through your words and actions, why they should work for you. Be a source of inspiration.

Take-Away

Employee engagement is dependent on commitment from management, a supportive culture, training, and empowerment. Provide employees with the knowledge and skills that will allow them to deliver a value that exceeds expectations. Remember that employees who are emotionally committed to the organization want to contribute. Give them the tools and opportunities to make the meaningful contributions that benefit them on and individual level and the organization as a whole.

© 2014 Elizabeth Stincelli