Category Archives: Relationships

Three Keys to Connecting with Others

chain link“The business of business is relationships; the business of life is human connection.” —Robin S. Sharma

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

We need human connection in both our personal and our professional lives. Almost everything that is accomplished is made possible through relationships. Since it is nearly impossible to succeed all alone, here are three keys to really connecting with others.

Listen authentically

Developing a relationship requires communication. But, the key to connecting with others is the listening side of the communication equation. Listening shows others that you are truly interested in them and what they have to say. It shows respect and allows you to get to know them as individuals on a deeper level.

Engage authentically

When you engage with others you show interest in their lives, their work, their goals, and their dreams. When you engage authentically you find the commonalities that create a sense of community, a sense of connection. Engagement, like listening, shows interest; it allows all parties to get to know each other, to find shared interests, and collaborate to achieve great goals.

Care authentically

At the end of the day, connection comes down to caring about another person. Not caring about what they have to offer you; not caring about whom they know; not caring about what they do; it’s about caring authentically. When you care about others on an individual basis you open the door to real connection.

Connect Authentically

Great things can be accomplished when two or more individuals connect authentically. This deep connection creates relationships that are built on trust and respect. Learn to listen, engage, and care authentically; these are the behaviors that foster true connection.

 

© 2016 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Liz Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the Founder of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Liz holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Liz by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

Developing Talent in Your Organization: Getting More from Your Employees by Giving M.O.R.E.

aditya ram21“We cannot create observers by saying ‘observe’, but by giving them the power and the means for this observation.” —Maria Montessori

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

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While Maria Montessori was speaking about the education of children, her idea applies just as well to employees and how we develop the talent in our organizations. We want to hire the best and the brightest, we get really excited when we find them, and then they leave. Why? The only way to keep employees with great potential is to give them M.O.R.E.

Have you ever had the experience of pulling into your driveway after leaving the office and realizing that you drove the whole way home on auto pilot? Sometimes I have even found myself driving, going into auto pilot mode, and heading to the office when where I intended to go was Costco. This phenomenon makes me laugh at myself, but it also gets me thinking about engaging our minds in what we are doing when tasks become routine. What might we miss along the way? Will we end up at our intended destination?

So, what happens when our employees’ tasks become routine? If they are not challenged or engaged and their mind goes on auto pilot, what might they miss? What opportunities for improvement are we sacrificing? How long will employees with great potential stay with our organization if they aren’t challenged and offered opportunity?

As a leader, you must learn to recognize the talent in your employees and give them the stage to shine. When you dedicate time and resources to developing the talent in your organization, you turn ordinary employees into extraordinary employees. If you want to get more from your employees, you are going to have to give M.O.R.E.

Motivate

Lee Iacocca emphasized that we should, “Start with good people, lay out the rules, communicate with your employees, motivate them and reward them. If you do these things effectively, you can’t miss.” Your employees possess knowledge, skills, and experience that they want to share with your organization. When you encourage them to make the most of their talents and you invest in them, your employees will become motivated. You must recognize that each employee is unique; they possess different talents and are motivated in different ways. Show that you value their capabilities, help them further develop their talents, and motivate them based on their individual personalities.

Opportunity

Steven Spielberg believes, “The delicate balance of mentoring someone is not creating them in your own image, but giving them the opportunity to create themselves.” You must learn to see the extraordinary potential in each employee and give them the opportunity to reach it. Give them the necessary skills and resources they need and then let them tackle challenges on their own and in their own way. Provide a safe place for them to try, fail, and learn from their mistakes. Give employees the opportunity to become the best versions of themselves; let them learn from one another, design how their own work gets done, and make decisions on their own. Create opportunities for your employees and then help them see that opportunity is available all around them.

Relationships

Joyce Meyer tells us, “We can improve our relationships with others by leaps and bounds if we become encouragers instead of critics.” Build relationships with your employees based on mutual trust and respect. Invest your time and resources into bringing out the best in others; become their coach and loudest cheerleader. Build a strong sense of community where employees feel a sense of belonging and a vested interest in the success of the organization. Communicate openly and share information often so employees know where they stand as individuals, where the team stands, and where the organization stands. When employees know that you care and are looking out for their best interest, you will build strong relationships that foster trust and loyalty.

Empower

Tom Ridge explained, “You have to enable and empower people to make decisions independent of you. As I’ve learned, each person on a team is an extension of your leadership; if they feel empowered by you they will magnify your power to lead.” Engage employees in contributing to problem identification and solving conversations. Encourage them to make decisions and to share their knowledge and experience with others. Give them the tools they need and then empower them to make decisions and take control of their own work.

Give M.O.R.E.

Everyone benefits when employees develop their talents; productivity increases, quality improves, and morale strengthens. When you invest in your employees and provide them with opportunity you will be amazed how your culture, morale, and outcomes improve.

Your investment in the development of your employees is proof that you value them as individuals, that you recognize the contribution they make to the organization, and that you are excited about their potential. As your employees grow, so will the capabilities and success of the organization, and so will you as a leader.

Help employees reach their full potential; retain valuable talent, and improve the adaptability of the organization by giving your employees M.O.R.E.

 

© 2015 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

Relationships: Strategy or Trust?

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“Friend, there’s no greater investment in life than in being a people builder. Relationships are more important than our accomplishments.”—Joel Osteen

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

Why Relationships Matter

Relationships play a role in every area of our lives; every experience, every lesson learned, every accomplishment. Our businesses are built on relationships, our friendships, our communities, and our families are all dependant on our ability to develop strong relationships. Relationships serve as a barometer, telling us if someone is a friend or a foe.

When it comes to your relationships, are they based solely on strategic positioning, or are they built on trust? Are they authentic? Are they rooted in looking out for each other’s best interests, or are you each in it only for yourselves?

Built on strategy?

Ross Perot believes, “Business is not just doing deals; business is having great products, doing great engineering, and providing tremendous service to customers. Finally, business is a cobweb of human relationships.” Are your relationships focused only on the deal? Relationships based solely on strategy are usually one-sided; they are manipulative and unsupportive. Are you focused on what’s in it for you? If you find yourself only doing for others because you expect something in return, you are in a strategic relationship.

Built on trust?

Albert Einstein told us, “Whoever is careless with the truth in small matters cannot be trusted with important matters.” Trusting connection is what brings relationships to life. Are you treating others the way you would like to be treated? Relationships built on trust are open and welcoming. In these types of relationships you are seeking to create win-win situations. Your communications are transparent and honest, and your intentions are clear. If you are each looking out for the best interest of the other, you are in a trusting relationship.

Build Strong Relationships

Strategic relationships are like a game of chess, except no one wins in this game. Mona Sutphen said, “Most good relationships are built on mutual trust and respect.” When you build strong relationships you create shared successes. You feel comfortable in these relationships knowing that your communications are honest, that they are not self-serving, and they are mutually supportive. Relationships are the vehicle with which you gain influence, create situations in which everyone wins, and achieve your goals. Building strong relationships which are based on trust, not strategy, is the key to success in your business, in your community, and in your home.

 

 

© 2015 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

Developing Talent in Your Organization

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“One of my greatest talents is recognizing talent in others and giving them the forum to shine.” —Tory Burch

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

Developing Talent

When you dedicate time and resources to developing talent within your organization you make ordinary employees into extraordinary employees. Everyone benefits when employees develop their talents; productivity increases, quality improves, and morale strengthens. As a leader, you have to remember that the most outspoken voices are not always the wisest; you must give everyone the opportunity to be heard and contribute. Provide them with shared values and principles but don’t overwhelm them with extensive rules and then give them the opportunity to show what they can do. Develop their talents and then give them control over their own tasks and decision-making. So, where do you start?

Relationships

Angela Ahrendts said, “Everyone talks about building a relationship with your customer. I think you build one with your employees first.” Create a healthy, productive organizational culture and start building relationship based on trust and respect. You need to be your employees coach and loudest cheerleader. Hire great, hard-working individuals and then bring out the very best in them by developing relationships and investing your time and resources. Don’t keep secrets; demonstrate that you have trust and confidence in your employees by sharing information and communicating openly. Stop treating your employees like children; put your trust in them and you will build loyal relationships and a strong sense of community.

Motivation

Dwight D. Eisenhower told us, “Motivation is the art of getting people to do what you want them to do because they want to do it.” As a leader, you must recognize that each employee is unique, possessing different talents and motivated in different ways. Your employees possess knowledge, skills, and experience that they want to share with the organization. No one wants to be treated like a machine; show that you value their capabilities by helping them to further develop their talents and motivating them based on their individual preferences. When you invest in your employees on an individual level you will be amazed at how motivated your workforce will become. Lift and encourage them; provide support through both your words and actions.

Opportunity

Bob Feller believed, “Every day is a new opportunity. You can build on yesterday’s success or put its failures behind and start over again. That’s the way life is, with a new game every day, and that’s the way baseball is.” Let your employees know that there are opportunities available all around them. Let them know that you see their extraordinary potential and then give them the opportunity to reach that potential. Give employees the skills and resourced necessary and then let them tackle challenges on their own while providing a safe place to for them to fail. Give them the opportunity to become the best version of themselves, to learn from one another, to design how their work gets done, and to make decisions within guidelines.

Extraordinary Results

Wade Boggs explained, “A positive attitude causes a chain reaction of positive thoughts, events, and outcomes. It is a catalyst and it sparks extraordinary results.” Your employees want to be extraordinary. When you invest in them and provide opportunity you will be amazed how your culture, morale, and outcomes improve.  Your investment stands as proof that you value them on an individual basis, that you appreciate their contribution to the organization, and that you recognize and are excited about their potential. As your employees grow, so will your success. Develop the talent in your organization, invest your time and resources, provide opportunity, cheer your employees on, and you will achieve extraordinary results.

 

© 2015 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

The Key to Building Rapport

 

“You want to work with people who you like and have an easy rapport with.” —Mike White

By Elizabeth Stincelli, DM

 

Rapport

Rapport helps us build close relationships in which we can work together and communicate with ease. In these relationships we empathize with each other and find commonalities that bring us even closer together. Rapport helps us to feel safe to share our dreams and fears. If rapport provides the foundation necessary for successful collaboration and mutual support, where should you start?

Relationships

Richard Bach said, “I want to be very close to someone I respect and admire and have somebody who feels the same way about me.” Rapport is about relationships and relationships are about give and take, mutual respect, and trust. When we develop respect and trust we feel safe. This safety allows us to open up, collaborate, and share new ideas. When we know we can count on someone to give as much as they take, we feel comfortable being there for them and turning to them in our times of need.

Empathy

Mohsin Hamid explained, “Empathy is about finding echoes of another person in yourself.” You cannot develop a meaningful connection with another person without empathy. Empathy allows us to understand what it feels like to walk in the shoes of another. It helps to create a supportive and safe environment where there is genuine concern for one another. This genuine concern leads us to act, not just in our own best interest, but the interest of others as well.

Commonality

Barbara Deming believed, “The longer we listen to one another – with real attention – the more commonality we will find in all our lives. That is, if we are careful to exchange with one another life stories and not simply opinions.” Finding commonality strengthens the relationships we build and the empathy we feel. When we ask questions and then really listen, we learn more about others, and the more common ground we will find. It’s easier to develop a close connection and strong relationship with those whom we feel we have thoughts, ideas, and experiences in common.

Building Rapport

When we build rapport, we improve our ability to develop meaningful relationships where communication and collaboration can thrive. Strong relationships built on trust and respect, empathy, and commonality contribute to developing the rapport that allows us to feel safe to share our hopes and dreams, as well as our deepest fears.

 

 

 

 

© 2015 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Elizabeth Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the CEO of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations engage employees and improve organizational culture. Elizabeth holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Elizabeth by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.