Tag Archives: Engage Now

Four Steps for Energizing Your Employees

“Super-ambitious goals tend to be unifying and energizing to people; but only if they believe there’s a chance of success.” —Peter Diamandis

If you want to energize your employees in working toward shared goals, they must believe that success is possible. I’m not just talking about company success, but also success for them as individuals. Here are four steps for energizing your employees.

Invest in them

When employees see that you are willing to invest your time and resources in their growth and success, they will be energized. As they grow so will their potential to make more meaningful contributions toward shared goals. When you invest in your employees, they will be willing to invest their best resources into the success of the organization.

Encourage them

When you encourage employees to overcome their fears and chase their dreams, they will become energized. We all want to be encouraged and to know that someone believes in us. When your employees feel encouraged, they will give 110% to achieving shared goals.

Provide opportunities

When you provide employees with new and challenging opportunities it shows that you trust in their abilities. Being challenged and given opportunities energizes employees. When employees know that there are ample opportunities, they will proudly contribute to the success of the organization.

Have their back

Make sure that employees feel safe. When you show them that you have their back in success and in failure, they will be energized. When employees know that you have their back, they will be willing to stretch beyond their current capabilities to reach higher and add even more value to organizational objectives.

Give Them a Reason to Believe

If you want to energize your employees, you must give them a reason to believe that they can be successful. They need to know that they can succeed personally as they are contributing to the success of the organization. Invest your time and resources in them. Give them encouragement. Provide them with challenging opportunities. Show them that you have their back. Give them a reason to believe that they can succeed and they will be energized.

 

 

© 2017 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Liz Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the Founder of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations change attitudes, change communication dynamics, improve collaboration and problem-solving, engage employees, and strengthen organizational culture. Liz holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Liz by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

Developing Cheerleaders within Your Organization

“When you encourage others, you in the process are encouraged because you’re making a commitment and difference in that person’s life. Encouragement really does make a difference.” —Zig Ziglar

We all need encouragement. Everyone in your organization from the C-Suite down to the front-line needs someone cheering them on. How nice would it be if we had a whole organization of cheerleaders; every employee encouraging every other employee? How much benefit would be derived not only from being encouraged by others but from knowing that you are making a difference? So, how do you develop cheerleaders within your organization?

Inspire passion

When people feel passionate about what they are doing, they naturally become a cheerleader for the cause. And, if they are cheering for the cause, they will also be cheering on those working toward that cause. Inspire your employees; help them see the meaningful purpose behind all their daily tasks.

Create community

When people feel like they are part of a community, they have a vested interest in the success of that community. Make sure every employee finds some commonality and sees that they fit into the work community despite their differences. When they know they are part of the community, they will cheer on their fellow members.

Set the example

When you, as a leader, cheer others on you serve as an example of support and encouragement. Your employees are watching you for signals of expected behavior. Make sure they see you cheering for each of them and they will soon follow your example.

It Makes a Difference

As Zig Ziglar said, “Encouragement really does make a difference.” Inspire passion in others so they will become cheerleaders for the cause and those working toward the cause. Create community where every member wants to see every other member succeed. Set the example of encouragement and support so others have a behavior to model. Develop your culture into one of commitment to the support and cheering on of others; what a difference it will make.

 

 

© 2017 Elizabeth Stincelli

Liz Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the Founder of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations change attitudes, change communication dynamics, improve collaboration and problem-solving, engage employees, and strengthen organizational culture. Liz holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Liz by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

Do Not Create a Culture of Fear

“This world of ours… must avoid becoming a community of dreadful fear and hate, and be, instead, a proud confederation of mutual trust and respect.” —Dwight D. Eisenhower

For as long as we have had written history, we know that people in power have used fear as a tool to control others. While fear may be an effective means of exerting control, it shows desperation on the part of a leader who is at a loss for any other means of gaining influence. Fear creates a culture where gains and progress are short lived. Employees will not thrive in this type of environment and where employees do not thrive, neither do the leaders or the organization as a whole. So, do not create a culture of fear!

Fear

A culture of fear will result in dread. Employees who dread coming to work will never give 100% of their potential productivity. A culture of fear creates a destructive circle where all trust is lost. And, without trust you, as a leader, lose your ability to influence others and in turn must resort to fear as a means of control. By creating a culture of fear you are drastically reducing your options for getting the results you desire.

Hate

A culture of fear is a breeding ground for hate. Hate creates a contentious environment where energy and focus are diverted from the tasks at hand to hateful and disgusted feelings toward others. When you, as a leader, use fear to control others you pit one group against another in order to perpetuate the fear and trigger distrust. Hate and distrust eliminate any chance for effective teamwork and collaboration. By creating a culture of fear you are undermining your own leadership effectiveness.

You Have the Control

As a leader, you have control over the culture you chose to create. If fear is your only option to influence your employees, you need to seriously reconsider whether you are leadership material. A culture of fear only leads to distrust and hate. This is not a culture that encourages teamwork and the contribution of 100% of employee potential to achieving organizational goals. You have the control. Either you will create a culture of fear that will give you short-term results but will undermine your leadership in the long run or you will create a supportive, trusting environment where everyone wants to work together for the success of the whole.

 

 

© 2017 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Liz Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the Founder of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations change attitudes, change communication dynamics, improve collaboration and problem-solving, engage employees, and strengthen organizational culture. Liz holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Liz by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

When Things Don’t Go as Planned

“Plans are nothing; planning is everything.” —Dwight D. Eisenhower

Even the best laid plans go sideways once in a while. In fact, you can almost always count on something not going according to plan. This is why Dwight D. Eisenhower’s above quote is so meaningful; you can’t count on the plan, but planning is everything. Here’s why:

Preparedness

Planning allows you to be prepared. If you know where you are, and you know where you want to end up, then you can start looking at the options for getting there. There is almost always more than one way to achieve a goal. The thought and research that goes into planning helps you to understand the multiple options available to you.

Flexibility

Flexibility is the key to responding instead of reacting when things don’t go according to plan. If you become dead-set on following your plan; step by step; from beginning to end, you will lack the flexibility necessary to adapt the plan to new or unforeseen circumstances. It is this flexibility that allows you to continue moving forward toward your goal even when your plan falls short.

Team strength

Planning gives you the opportunity to assess the strength of each of your team members. Knowing their strengths in advance gives you an advantage when things start going sideways. Who will be your best pinch-hitter in different situations when things don’t go according to plan? Don’t leave yourself scrambling at the last minute trying to figure out what to do; know who to turn to when the going gets tough.

Roll with the Punches

The key is to plan, but also plan for your plan to break-down along the way. Be prepared, build flexibility into your plan, and know your team member’s strengths. When things don’t go as planned, fall back on your planning and roll with the punches.

 

 

© 2017 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Liz Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the Founder of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations change attitudes, change communication dynamics, improve collaboration and problem-solving, engage employees, and strengthen organizational culture. Liz holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Liz by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

Why are Some Employees Underachieving?

“Desire is the key to motivation, but it’s determination and commitment to an unrelenting pursuit of your goal – a commitment to excellence – that will enable you to attain the success you seek.” —Mario Andretti

When looking at employee achievement it’s easy to assume that some people have it and some people just don’t. But, what if that weren’t true? What if you, as a leader, had the ability to turn every employee into an achiever? You really need to ask yourself, “Why are some employees underachieving?”

Right position

The first question to ask yourself is, “Do I have the right person in the right position?” The best employee can underachieve when placed in a position that is not a good fit for their strengths. This quickly spirals into the employee losing confidence in their own abilities and management underestimating what this employee is truly capable of.

Desire

Another thing to look at is desire. We all want to do something that gives us a sense of accomplishment, something worth waking up for in the morning. When an employee feels that their contribution makes a real difference they have the desire to keep adding value. If they feel like they are going through meaningless motions just to earn a paycheck, they quickly lose the desire to put forth their best efforts.

Commitment

How committed are your employees? Well, one good gauge of their commitment to the organization is how committed you, as a leader are to them. Commitment is a two-way street; just because you pay an employee to perform a task does not buy you their commitment. Do they feel secure in their job? Do they feel appreciated? When employees do not feel that you are committed to them, they quickly lose any aspiration to be fully invested in their jobs or the organization.

Encouragement

Even the most unskilled employee might surprise you if you offer them encouragement. We all struggle sometimes. It might be lack of training or experience; it might be low self-confidence; it might be struggles in our personal life that cause us to lose focus, but a little encouragement from a trusted and respected leader can help turn a poor performer into an outstanding performer.

Support

Any employee can slip backward into becoming an underachiever if they do not have the support they need. No one can succeed when left all on their own; we need a team, a support structure. And, as the leader, you are the foundation of that support structure. Knowing that someone has your back, that someone is cheering you on goes a long way in turning underachievers into achievers.

Your Role

Underachievement is often not an employee problem, but a leadership problem. As a leader, it is your responsibility is to ensure you have the right people in the right positions. You must give them meaningful work that inspires the desire to contribute even more. You must be committed to them so they will be committed to you. You must offer encouragement. And, they must know they have your support. What if you could turn every employee into an achiever?

 

© 2017 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Liz Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the Founder of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations change attitudes, change communication dynamics, improve collaboration and problem-solving, engage employees, and strengthen organizational culture. Liz holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Liz by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.

 

What Will They Say at Your Retirement Party?

“It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you’ll do things differently.” —Warren Buffett

A principal of the architectural firm that I work with recently retired. As I listened to his colleagues speak and watched the video interviews with employees, managers, clients, and fellow principals I started to wonder, “What will people say when I retire?” Have you ever given it any thought? Here are a few of the things that contribute to your reputation and what others will have to say at your retirement party.

What did they see?

Actions speak louder than words. Were your actions authentic? Were you willing to roll up your sleeves and get your hands dirty? Did you set a good example for others to follow? People are always watching; your behaviors have a great impact on others and their perception of you. What did they see?

What did they hear?

Were you true to your word? How did you speak of others? Were your words encouraging or were they biting? Was your communication style open and honest? Was it consistent regardless of who you were speaking with? What did they hear?

How did they feel?

Did they know you cared? Was there a sense of mutual trust and respect? Were you willing to invest your time and resources into helping them become the best they could be? How did you make them feel?

What Will They Say?

When that day finally comes and people gather together to acknowledge the contributions you have made to their work lives, what will they say? What did they see? Were your actions authentic? What did they hear? Were your words encouraging or biting? How did they feel? Did they know you cared? Your legacy lasts far longer than the years you put into any position. What will you leave behind in the hearts and minds of those you worked with?

 

 

© 2017 Elizabeth Stincelli

 

Liz Stincelli is passionate about recognizing and inspiring the leader in each of us. She is the Founder of Stincelli Advisors where she focuses on helping organizations change attitudes, change communication dynamics, improve collaboration and problem-solving, engage employees, and strengthen organizational culture. Liz holds a Doctor of Management degree with an emphasis on organizational leadership.

Learn more about Liz by visiting her website, stincelliadvisors.com and connect with her on Twitter @infinitestin, Google+, and LinkedIn. You can contact her by email at stincelliadvisors@gmail.com.